Tag Archive | politics

Who’s Not In School?

My new book on sale 27th May

Have you ever wondered what a home educating week is like?

Every wondered what a home schooling family is like and what they get up to?

Or, if you’re a home educating family, have you longed for a book that you can share with your little ones that actually has a home educated child as the star?

Later this month there’ll be one to fulfil those briefs!

‘Who’s Not at School’ is a picture book about Little Harry and his family and what they get up to in an ordinary week, from an ordinary swim to some not quite so ordinary experimentation!

Because, actually, that’s what it gets to be like when you’ve home educated for a while – ordinary! And there are so many thousands now, so many who are making such a brilliant job of educating their kids outside of mainstream school, that it’s beginning to seem an ordinary choice to be making. Especially in the light of current political events.

What’s politics got to do with it?

Exactly!

Politics should have nothing to do with our children’s learning, but I have the feeling that the education of our kids is more about political popularity and vote winning than it is about what’s good for a child. And no doubt after the next election there will be even more disruption as another wave of changes hits the system and leaves children and teachers floundering and pressured in their wake.

Home schooling gives parents the opportunity to educate their kids for education’s sake, not for politics’ sake.

You can keep politics out of it and get on with the proper job of learning. Which is probably why so many now choose to do it.

So, who’s not in school? Far more children than you probably realise!

Pop over to the publisher’s site where you can pre-order: http://birdsnestbooks.co.uk/

(And there’s also a home educating story for the grown-ups via my book; ‘A Funny Kind of Education’. It’ll change the way you view education forever!)

Education is for living – not just for politics!

Is this all that education is about?

Education! I’ve been going on about it a long time, even if not the education other people think of.

When I talk about it I mean education for life, not schooling, that’s something different. And I’m still being educated now. We all are, even if we’re not aware of it.

I suppose my awareness started way back when I was in school. I wasn’t very old when thought; ‘this is crap! This is so not for me’! But I didn’t believe myself back then; after all, what do kids know?

Moving into teaching I began to see it wasn’t good for a some others either, pupils nor staff. And I also began to see that schooling was not for true education, it was just for schools. For the big industrialisation process that schooling has become.

We went on to home educate partly because we didn’t want to force our children to fit that industrialisation process. We wanted their education to be for living their lives, not for perpetuating school lives and school businesses. We saw education as the personal developmental process of an individual – not an industry. Or an establishment.

Admittedly, we wanted our youngsters to grow and develop towards living and working as part of a community. But that’s about community more than industrial cloning which the government has pushed schooling towards. Communities are about people and education is about people too.

Education is about learning how to live together, how to communicate and contribute, how to further both our individual understanding and world understanding too.

And there are many young people now who have grown their education in individual ways through home educating – or self education as it more accurately is – towards that outcome. Although outcome is the wrong word because education doesn’t really have an outcome, as in an end, it is ongoing and has continuing new, updated outcomes throughout life. This is what we need to understand about education. It doesn’t have limits.

Education is not only about schools.

Education is not only about the short space of time youngsters are in institutions, or about institutionalisation.

Education is not just a political tool which MPs are wielding at the moment to gain our votes.

Education is for life not just for politics. And that might be a good thought to keep in mind when you try and weave your way through the confusion of policies and promises politicians are bandying about in order to tempt our vote.

Education is for life, not just for votes!

What kind of education – and life – would you really like for your child?

Monitoring – a very sensitive issue

There was a report in the press at the end of last year which raised the issue of monitoring and registering of home educating families with the Local Authorities.

Westminster council wants to impose annual visits to home educating families which some believe infringes their rights as parents. (Read it here)

This has always been a sensitive issue for families who home educate.

The government has long been trying to enforce registration of all home educated children so that numbers and whereabouts are known to authorities, citing ‘safeguarding’ as a reason for doing so.

But many families feel that the welfare of children is not the government’s primary purpose; their real purpose is to maintain control, rather than acknowledge the success of parents educating differently. After all, home school success throws into question the value of schooling.

It’s an issue I’ve often pondered.

I can see how some, ignorant of home education, would feel that home educated children could be in danger of being isolated and their education neglected, even be at risk of being abused in this scenario. But this kind of isolation is extremely rare. Yet there are cases of children being abused who are known to the authorities, who do go to school, so the safeguarding issue is hardly a valid argument. And if those involved would do some deeper research into the practises of home educators and the outcomes they achieve it would become clear that the education of these children is not a matter for concern. Overall, home educated children develop into skilled, social, intelligent young people who go on to work or higher education just as others do.

The real issue here is one of the authorities wanting control.

Education, ever since it became formalised through schooling, has become a strong political force. It is a way of controlling what people think, what they do, how they organise themselves, how they live their lives, how and what they earn and how they operate within the big machine of industry and consumerism – which of course lines the pockets of the government. And education is also an emotive lever politicians use mercilessly to win votes.

Schooling has become a political tool – which it never should be. It is tightly controlled by narrow, restrictive outcomes – which are not needed. Tested and inspected by people making heinous judgements to an agenda that has little to do with the individual’s needs and more to do with institutional needs.

It is the thought of these school-conditioned, result-blind, narrow minded and often bigoted officers coming into our homes and making assessments about educational approaches of which they are totally ignorant, that home educators abhor.

Home educators are successfully operating and educating outside those governmental controls and ministers don’t like it – that’s what their registration argument is really about.

Home education success shows up the enforced schooling processes as not the only approach to developing intelligent, productive and valuable members of society. It also demonstrates that parents, not politicians, can make intelligent and valid choices about the education of their children without elitist ministers – who have absolutely no concept of how the majority outside their wealthy little enclaves live – taking control of it.

Home educating families have already proved that we don’t need to be monitored or registered for children to be safe, sensitively and intelligently educated. Something that schooling doesn’t always achieve!

The right to educational freedom

I thought I’d respond to Jax’s call for posts about educational freedoms.

The freedom to educate our children outside of the school system is a topic dear to my heart, having had two children who were failing to thrive both educationally and personally within it.

I’m thoroughly suspicious of politicians who try to control our home education, pretending they do so for the good of the child. What do they know about it?! And I’ve seen too many children in schools when I worked there who were not having any good done to them at all for me to believe that.

I also see that, although ministers cite ‘safe guarding’ as an excuse to do so, there are as many safe-guarding issues already existing with children known to schools and other services and they can’t seem to get it ‘safe’ for them, so that reason doesn’t ring true. What it does do is deflect attention away from the impingement of our rights by their ‘concern’.

I believe it is more the case that politicians are simply using that as a strategy to control and mask the rising dissatisfaction so many parents now have with the school system.

Calling home education ‘elective’ is the best mask of all. For I would say that in most cases parents do not ‘elect’ to home educate, they are driven to it in desperation by the failure of schools to provide children with exactly what home educators are by law supposed to provide; an education suitable to their age, ability and aptitude. Consider this; if there was a place where our children could go to be stimulated and inspired, with adults who respected and encouraged, supported and nurtured our children’s individuality and education, where they had real choice and the experiences were such that the kids were gagging to go, how many parents would opt to home educate then?

Home education is growing because politicians are failing to provide what children need. Any attempt to limit the educational freedom it offers is in my view a corrupt strategy to deflect attention away from that failing.

Educational freedom is not really freedom in the real sense of the word, although home educators are freed from the inhibiting structures of a school system, which is a good thing as most impair learning rather than aid it (testing and Ofsted are good examples). However, none of us are truly free in that we want to fit into the social world that surrounds us, we want to earn and work, eat and survive, enjoy life and have friends, and all those things come with responsibility which we choose to take on.

Nearly all the home educating parents I know take on that responsibility extremely conscientiously by demonstrating that to their children though encouraging learning – in fact most of the kids do it for themselves. It’s just they choose to use other approaches. And that’s where we really need the freedom. Freedom to choose approaches which suit our individual children better than the system does. Freedom to work to the needs of the child, rather than make the child fit the needs of the establishment as schooling does.

As home educated children grow up and begin working as generations are doing now they are proof that other approaches work, that educational freedom and independence works, that we don’t need a government to do it for us. Proof that we don’t need registering, testing, watching, examining, controlling of our approaches, or telling how to do it for it to work. It’s working fine already!

In fact, when I think about it, I can’t help feeling that it is in breach of basic human rights to be told what you must know, how you must know it, where, when and at what age you must know it, that you must not question what is done to you in the name of knowing it, that you have no choice in the matter and if you don’t comply you’ll be a failure. Is that not totally bizarre? Where else in life are those freedoms for choice and preference taken away from us – except in prison of course?

It’s almost as if the powers that be would control our minds by controlling our education. Not forgetting that if politicians can control our minds they can control our votes.

But maybe that’s just me being extra cynical!

Is school really educating?

When you’ve been through school yourself and it was a successful experience you’d probably never think about it?002

And some people prefer to be silently led and feel part of an institution without challenging traditions, or ‘being difficult’ as it’s sometimes labelled!

I think I must be one of the ‘difficult’ ones. Because I’ve suspected from the outset that school doesn’t really educate as we need it too. In fact it inhibits the kind of thinking required for us to develop and progress.

Thankfully I’m no longer alone in those thoughts. And it’s really wonderful to find others who think, like I and other home educating parents do, that school is beginning to look more and more like a farming process for the benefit of the institution – and politics – than it is about the education of individuals.

Ken Robinson is another of those who also challenges this cloning of our children and their diverse talents, increasingly neglected in the laboratory of controlled experiences for a narrow set of outcomes, as schooling has become. (Find him here)

He talks about schooling in his book ‘The Element How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything’ and how he feels it is outdated. He raises three key issues.

Firstly, he says that schools are preoccupied with specific academic ability rather than the broader intelligences that each human being is capable of. So school can become a narrowing experience rather than an developmental one.

Secondly, he says that the hierarchy of subjects, with maths, sciences and language skills at the top, humanities in the middle and arts at the bottom, neglects the fact that it is diverse thinking developed through creative practises which help the world progress and which are at the forefront of human progress (like the Net for example). So we desperately need the creative subjects that are becoming squeezed out along with the more physical and practical.

And thirdly, the obsession with particular types of assessment, via a narrow range of standardised tests, negates the developmental progress of an individual and essential creativity of thinking.

The result is a narrowing of intelligence, capacity and talent, rather than a broadening of it, and a complete dismissal of all the more human elements like relationships, character, emotions and expression, which are an essential part of our intelligent growth.

He goes on to explain how ‘getting back to basis’ is far from a good thing because we need new ‘basics’ for our new world.

We basically need new thinking, both educational and personal, for our new world. But schools are not supporting that need as their goals and targets become narrow and political.

It makes for fascinating reading. And I applaud his ideas; it’s so comforting to find others thinking the same.

So if you’ve never looked at schooling like this before his book will ignite some exciting thinking! Excited thinking being exactly what we need to help the world progress.

Letters to move the mind….

The Sunday papers are great for lighting the fire. There’s plenty of it, although the magazines aren’t that flammable with their shiny perspectives and shiny paper; they’re better for lining the dustbins.

It’s rare we buy them as I generally don’t read them; far too much ego stroking claptrap to make the good bits worthwhile. But The Sunday Times found its way into the house this last weekend and I had a flick through it.

I stopped at the Editor’s letter in one of the shiny bits, not sure why. It must have been the word ‘creative’ on the first line. Her piece was a good little take on being creative which, as anyone who visits here regularly knows, is one of my mini obsessions in education: that it is not education without it!

Tiffanie asks what we do to be creative?

And there’s a lovely bit where she even describes shopping as creative; it’s a ‘way of curating your life’ she says. Fabulous phrase – I’m sure my eldest will be glad to read that!

But she also goes on to quote Richard Wurman of TED fame who says that most of us don’t know how to question and that the foundation of the word question is quest and so few have a quest in life. He says that creativity comes from a quest.

I would add that creativity also comes from questioning. And that questioning is not only the foundation of creativity, it is the foundation of scientific progress and discovery and the foundation of education.

Education is surely a creative and scientific quest to fulfil our innate curiosity and thirst to know about life and create the best lives we can.

I also believe that school is increasingly disabling youngsters from doing that.

I’m backed up in thinking that by the artist Bob and Roberta Smith. An old friend who popped up on The Culture show like a blast from disconnected pasts. Our connections are linked to childhoods, and although not well maintained, do sometimes cross the tangle of life and ignite shared values. And I rediscovered his fantastic piece of work directed at Michael Gove, a man who understands children’s educational needs as much as I understand infant heart surgery. Bob explains why creativity is important and says that it is beaten out of children by the stagnant system, even by taking away their control of their own art.

Their insatiable curiosity, inherent from being born, also disappears along with their desire to question and discover. It takes away control of their own life too and their own quests. Without a quest they have no motivation, or direction when finally spewed out of institutionalisation with little understanding of the world outside.

This is what results from lack of creativity, lack of questioning, lack of life-lust. No education should result in that.

So we should perhaps all be writing our own letters to papers, to ministers, online, to try and get them to see there is another approach to life and education through creative, questioning thinking. The approach most home educators tend to use.

One that creates ideas that do more than just line dustbins.

Treasure at the library

library 004Have you ever taken your child to the library? Have you ever listened to the absorbed silence as little ones suddenly find themselves surrounded by hundreds of picture books to open and investigate and drool over?

It’s enthralling! Far better than bookshops; it’s less embarrassing when they drool!

We had a wonderful service when we home educating. We had a visiting library van trundling down our rural road every two weeks. Don’t know how it managed it, mounting the bank that the lane weaves over and turning round in a farm yard.

This fabulous service meant that we didn’t always have to make the twenty mile round trip for the children to enjoy the revelation of being among loads of books. And it was almost like a special delivery service for me as I could order my books online from the catalogue, books that probably wouldn’t be in our local library anyway, and have them brought out on the van. So both me and the children were in heaven.

Of course that disappeared with all the other cuts to public spending. And I’m not surprised – it was rather lavish. But it will be utterly tragic if our smaller libraries get closed. Or funding to get the library van out the remote villages is stopped.

Because however small we sometimes find these local libraries, they are a lifeline to worlds not otherwise available. Worlds that are seen through encounters with books and computers that some can only access through libraries.

The trouble is with the politicians who make the decisions about cuts is that they have little experience of what it’s like to be poor. Most come from a position of having everything they need to be able to go where they want and the money to pay for it. Most of the rest of us don’t. Many people will never know the world beyond their own lane end or city street. Except for the unrealistic junk on television and the gross idolisation of celebrity, often breeding envy and idleness and even the hopelessness of ever attaining those riches.

So libraries promote another culture. A culture of access and worldliness, knowledge and wordiness, for those without other means.

For despite the middle classes all clustered together in their exclusive enclaves we have other clusters of cultural poverty where people may never get the flavour of aspiration that can change their lives.

Maybe it suits the politicians to keep us down that way, for it fuels their luxurious lifestyles. And closing down these small but vital public services is a way of also closing down those aspirations.

We mustn’t let them get away with it.

But I didn’t mean to get political. I just meant to say that it is an important part of our parenting to take our kids to libraries, to show them what a worth of both opportunity and immense pleasure there can be in books and stories and technological tales from a wider world than the one they inhabit. We need to fight for them.

For the most irreplaceable impact of regular library visits is that when children are surrounded by beautiful books they are inevitably inspired to read.