How do people get so ignorant?

How could you litter this place?

I just had a super little holiday in the Yorkshire Dales. The best thing about it was being outside on the hills and hollows from dawn to dusk almost, the weather being absolutely perfect.

It was the perfect holiday for me because outside in a natural environment is where I really love to be and, as you’ll know if you’re connected to me on Instagram, I’ll take most weathers. But last week’s constant light and sunshine was an amazing bonus I couldn’t resist. So constant, in fact, I nearly had heatstroke.

The only thing that was less than perfect was the bag of rubbish!

There we were tramping up this hill, so far from anywhere that only the dedicated few would make the effort to go. So you’d think it would only be folks who really appreciate it who’d go there. Yet what does one of those folks do? Decide to leave their plastic bag of picnic rubbish; sandwich packets and plastic bottles, polluting that glorious environment, expecting someone else to pick up after them.

I ask you – what kind of mentality do they have?

We were in exquisitely beautiful countryside, we’re actually able to walk this land as a privilege not a right, we are as such extremely lucky, and that’s how people wish to repay that privilege? By expecting others to clean up after them as they take their personal recreation and enjoyment. This being land where people live and work and depend upon for their livelihood? Never mind the risk to other living things.

How do people get so ignorant? I fail to understand what kind of education they can have had.

As I walked back down the hill, I picked up the dangerous bag, carried it back and disposed of it.

It would have been easy not to.

But I’ve learnt from my daughter. Her integrity almost puts mine to shame. I would never throw litter down – but I don’t often pick it up after others either, as she does.

She and I were walking together through the park in town where someone else has flung their discarded litter about the place. There are bins provided – very near – but no, it’s too much effort to carry litter to a bin. So she picks it up and puts it in the bin in passing. Such a simple unselfish act, she takes upon herself. She does it whenever she walks through and sees the need.

We’re often accused of making our home schooled kids dependent – or depriving them of independence by keeping them at home. (Total balderdash as you can read from this recent post) Yet I see her independently taking responsibility not only for her own rubbish but for the rubbish of those ignorant gits who are dependent on others picking up after them.

Ironic isn’t it!

The hills and remote places were otherwise glorious. And do a great deal to heal the sometimes less glorious thoughts that creep in about the less glorious others we have to share them with.

I do hope you’ll never be one of them!

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Still hungering to open minds!

I would like to think things had changed from when I first wrote this quite a few years ago. Judging by the accusations still thrown our way I sometimes wonder!

Out in the real world experiencing real things

As home educators you get accused of a lot of things:

–          You get accused of tying your children to your apron strings and being unable to let them go.

–          You get accused of narrowing their education to the confines of your home.

–          You get accused of wanting to molly coddle them instead of allowing them to acclimatize to the rough and tumble of the ‘real’ world.

–          You get accused of both wanting to academically cram your children and the opposite of totally neglecting their education.

–          You get accused of being weird and alternative.

–          And the worst thing of all; you get accused of being a parent who does not care about education since you don’t send your child to school.

What is so galling about these accusations is that firstly, in the case of most home educating families, the exact opposites are true. And secondly they are usually made by people who have no first hand experience of home education and who speak in complete ignorance! Often in fear.

Far from tying the kids to their apron strings most home educating parents are giving their children an opportunity to be out in the ‘real’ world. The real ‘real’ world that is, not the artificial world of school.

Far from narrowing their education, home education extends the child’s experiences far beyond the home and the world becomes their learning environment, gaining them an understanding of how the world works and how they fit into it beyond the classroom. Home educated children are exposed to a wide range of people and a wide range of social experiences over and above the limits and unnatural clustering of school ones.

As for academically cramming or neglecting their education; most home educating families strive to achieve a far better balance in their educational provision than that which a child would normally achieve within the restrictions of the national curriculum. A balance between first hand learning and study, a balance between passive learning and active engagement, a balance between physical activities, arts, sciences, field trips, experimentation, personal development, independent learning, investigation, creative innovation, intellectual stimulation and a social diversity which extends way beyond that which they would receive going to the same school with the same bunch of people, day after day, year after year.

Far from being molly coddled most home educating families give their child some say in the educational process, unlike their educationally spoon-fed contemporaries in school, thus building essential skills needed for independence.

And far from being weird and alternative we are actually very ordinary parents who want the same simple things every parent wants for their children; their health and happiness, continued development and achievement, and realisation of their individual potential.

And finally, far from being neglectful of their education, we are totally and one hundred percent committed to it. Why else would any parent take such a mammoth step?

Things have changed a bit – there are thousands more families accepting home schooling for the workable option it is.

But I still hunger to open closed minds. To invite people to do a little personal learning, step beyond their normal conditioned responses and seek to understand that there are many, many approaches to education that are as equally successful as the one they are used to through school. And to grow a little tolerance and compassion towards those people who would make different choices to their own.

Please pass it on!

The hypocrisy of educational discrimination

I’m a fairly tolerant person. And – yep – even the kids agree after all those years of home education!

But discrimination is one thing I have no tolerance of. Particularly the discrimination in the education system.

Most people don’t spot it. But it’s there.

I don’t mean the usual kind of discrimination between things like ethnicity, or gender, or disability perhaps. The things that get talked about in the press regularly.

I mean the kind of discrimination that remains conveniently hidden but is practiced to make sure things like stats or league tables don’t get lowered by those children who don’t ‘perform’ to the system.

I’m talking about the discrimination towards those who learn differently. 

The hypocrisy of it is shocking.

There are heads, teachers, establishments and centres for learning, writing their policies that state they are inclusive, yet those same establishments discriminate against those who don’t fit into their preferred way of learning.

They group and label children through academic test results only, consequently creating an academic hierarchy some children will have no hope of climbing – because they need a different learning framework. They label these children as ‘failures’ or as having ‘learning difficulties’, or ‘slow learners’ which is discriminatory in itself.

However, as many home educating families are proving, give these kids a different learning approach and time frame and they can achieve the same later outcomes as many of their peers. So does that not prove that if we stopped discriminating against those children with different learning needs many would achieve more in school? And does that not count as discriminating against some whilst championing those who make the school look good?

I know that some schools will squeeze kids out of their establishment, often by subtle means of suggestion that the child would achieve more elsewhere for example. Whereas the reality is that they don’t want these children in their establishment lowering their statistics.

This is blatant discrimination in my book however it is accounted for. It has even been known for some schools to suggest home education as a way of getting ‘failing’ or often absent children off their register.

How is this not discrimination? Makes me sick to think of it going on. And it’s in total disrespect of those hard working schools and teachers who refuse to follow this practice.

A system of education has evolved that does NOT suit all kids and subtle practices have developed that discriminate against those who do not fit into it. How is that different from setting up an establishment for fair haired children, for example, and discriminating against those who are dark haired?

I may be tolerant for the most part. But I am not tolerant of this hidden discrimination against those bright, able, active, and diverse children who may be less academic than others but who have intelligences that exceed many of their academic contemporaries who cannot think outside the box.

Academics is a skill. Swimming is a skill. But we don’t discriminate against those who can’t swim.

Schools need to practice what they preach about less discrimination! And instead of blinding us with their policies of popular political correctness, make sure that a policy of no-discrimination applies throughout their learning provision.

Why should home educating always be positive!

I was sharing some tweets with Kate @kateonthinice recently as she reported a positive home educating day on her blog. 

She’d fallen into a trap common with many home schooling families. The trap that makes you believe that just because you chose to home educate, every day should be positive. And actually there’s two traps, the second one being that if it isn’t you start to feel guilty about it!

I did it! I bet many home educators reading this have done it too – are doing it now perhaps? But now I know that this is absolutely crazy thinking.

Regularly check in with the things that make you feel good

Crazy in the first place to assume that you can make every day positive when in fact, you’re just human and some human days are totally crap, home educating or not! And crazy to overlook the glaringly obvious fact that, whatever you are doing, it is never always positive.

Life isn’t like that! Why would we assume home educating is one hundred percent positive all the time?

Get real!

Ironically, I’ve been reading lately about keeping happy. (I needed a booster after a recent bereavement). And there was quite an amazing idea in this book along with the usual notes about checking in with the small things, understanding your bad habits, getting exercise, etc.

The basic idea in conclusion was that generally we are born happy. We generally do not come into the world negative. But as we grow and experience difficulties and challenges which are inevitable if we want to do anything, we encounter things that makes us unhappy. What happens then is that we easily get into the habit of becoming tense about these things, then these habits become our default and before we know what’s happening we’re practising negativity all the time.

What we have to do to counteract this is to remember to put our default switch back to positive – remember the things that make us feel good and act on them. Remember that challenges sometimes get in the way of feeling positive but they can be overcome. And remember to return to our positive default when they have.

Nice idea!

In relation to home educating the same thing can happen. After a while we can easily become too serious. We can become bogged down with comparing our pathways to school ones (which is what we wanted to abandon remember). We can sometimes get too heavy with our youngsters. We can get over burdened on occasion with the magnitude of what we’re doing in stepping away from mainstream.

What helps on these occasions when you feel a bit negative and worry whether home educating was a positive decision after all, is to remember; 

  • life is never one hundred percent positive and schooling would equally be throwing up a whole bunch of negatives
  • to seek out others to talk to
  • to keep a balanced perspective on it all by remembering why you did it in the first place
  • to step back and see the bigger picture!

And stop feeling guilty if your days go askew for a while – totally understandable – parenting often goes askew whatever you’re up to. Don’t blame home education.

Life often goes askew. But guess what?

You can change it!

 

(Don’t forget; ‘A Home Education Notebook’ may help with some of those times too). Available  Eyrie Press. or Amazon. See the My Books page for more details.

The teacher who couldn’t read

A little while ago I read the most amazing story on the BBC news by John Corcoran. He was a teacher for 17 years who had hidden the fact that he couldn’t read.

The teacher John Corcoran who kept it secret that he couldn’t read or write. Read his moving story

A teacher who couldn’t read? How shocking is that?

Or is it? Is it more shocking that someone who was so devoted to trying to better himself, despite his inability to pick up this skill, should be so ashamed of it that he had to keep it secret.

But perhaps the real shocker is the fact that our so-called inclusive society so looks down on people who cannot read that they feel compelled to do so?

Read his amazing story here.

The subject of his story is something that often bugs me; that we make judgements about people’s intelligence and about them as people just because they are different from us and cannot develop the skills required for reading in the same way we might.

Reading is a skill – a multitude of skills combined together – just like driving, for example. The ability to drive is also a set of skills that some people never manage to acquire, despite persistently trying. Reading is the same; a set of skills that because of the differences in people, some are unable to develop the same way as others.

We are all different. What works for some doesn’t work for others. Do we acknowledge that? For some things we do. For reading we seem to forget it.

Some learners need very different approaches, need very different time frames, in order to get to grips with reading.

But this is not an indication of low intelligence or ignorance or a defect. It’s just how some people are.

The readers among us are not superior to the non-readers. Just as the drivers are not superior to the non-drivers.

We’re just different.

Let’s take away the snobbery, the pressure, and the judgement people like John and others like him have felt over the years and let’s support everyone in their differences, whatever they are.

Let’s live up to our claim of being an all-inclusive society and stop the shocking judgements that exist about those who do not read in the same way as others so that there’s no shame or secret surrounding it. And so that more can tell their story and get the proper support they need without feeling as bad as he did.

Can you take part in a former home schooler’s student survey?

I’ve recently been contacted by former US home schooler, Devon Rose Turner, now studying in the UK. She’s keen to research home education over here as part of her degree and asked if I’d get in touch with my readers to see if you would mind completing her survey. I thought the best thing would be for her to post here as it’s always fascinating to read what grown up HEors are getting on with.

So here’s her post:

Devon in a recent workshop with home educators

Home Education and Museums & Galleries: Building the Bridge 

It seemed only natural to research home education when it came time to do my dissertation for my MA in Museums and Galleries in Education at UCL IoE.

When I was a child, I was home educated by my mother alongside my two younger sisters in the United States. In our small Pennsylvania town, my mother was really a pioneer; choosing to home educate her children and paving the way for many more home educating families over the years. Visiting museums, galleries and heritage sites was routinely part of our curriculum and my mother sought out visits according to our growing interests.

Fast forward 20 years and I’ve found myself in London immersing myself in the vibrant arts and culture scene. I’m currently working with contemporary artists for my work placement at the V&A with the Residency Programme. I’m also a volunteer with St. Paul’s Cathedral in the Schools and Family Learning department and a programme facilitator with ‘Learning Through Artefacts’; educational object handling sessions with home educating families within Greater London. These experiences have helped to form the museum educator I am today, and have also provided a great background for my current research.

For my dissertation, I’m interested in finding out more about the relationship between home educating families and museums and galleries. What types of educational museum programmes are available for home educating families? How do they market to individual families v. various schools? Knowing that there are often children of various ages present, how are the programmes structured? I intend to find out more about all facets of this relationship and use my findings to help museums improve their educational offer. Each year the number of home educated students has increased in England, and I aim to find out how educational teams at museums and galleries have responded to this expanding audience.

I have a survey that I am circulating within England for all currently home educating parents. If you fit the bill, or know someone who does, please consider helping me with my research! (Link below)

I’ve met some fantastic people through social media (particularly Twitter) who have helped me hone my research focus and provide me with lots of helpful background information about home education in England.

With the help of these contacts, I’ve arranged two case studies this summer, one in Birmingham at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, and the other at Great North Museum: Hancock in Newcastle upon Tyne. In Birmingham, I’ll be observing and interviewing individuals involved in a specialized home education programme and in Newcastle upon Tyne, I’ll be observing a home education takeover day and interviewing the administrator of an extensive excellence in the arts award for home educators.

I’m so excited to see some amazing museum programming in action and to meet lots of inspiring people along the way! And to see how my research can be of help to home educators with the development of a museum resource guide and programme list.

Here is the link to my survey, https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/S5KR5N5

My Twitter handle is @DevRoseTurner if you’d like to connect further. Follow me for updates on my research!

Thanks to Devon for her interesting piece. Do click on the link and help her with her survey as I’m sure it will help provide more resources for home educating families in the future

Meanwhile, if there are other home educators who are moving on now and would like to tell their story, do contact me!

Beyond home education

Okay, I’m going to do something I rarely do; put up a mugshot!

This is because when you start out home educating, or think about it as an option for the family, you rarely imagine that one day these littlies will be grown ups. What you normally think is OMG, what are we doing; how will it all turn out?

And this is to show you that it will all turn out okay – the kids will be fine and they’ll still love you!

Our home education took place in many venues and many forms. Charley left, Chelsea right.

If you’ve been reading this blog recently you’ll know I’ve just spent some time in Brighton watching Chelsea’s production in the Fringe – that’s what she’s doing now. She has her own production company which she runs with her partner producing shows (it’s Edinburgh Fringe next), as well as employment to keep the roof over her head and fund some of her enterprises.

Happily Charley could get time off work and come with us – it’s rare we can get all together at the same time. She’s an assistant manager with a big retail company now but also building an independent craft business at the same time.

They are hard working, intelligent, social and competent young women making independent lives for themselves and I’m immensely proud. But in those early days home educating I could never have predicted any of this. You just parent and guide and suggest and encourage and actually – with that support – they do it for themselves.

So, our two have chosen those routes, but other home educating families we knew have done other things, took degrees, are in various professions and self-employment. All busy. All independent. All social. All living their own succesful lives – but successful has a very personal and individual definition anyway. Just like with school kids – you can’t really predict how things will turn out. Both require an amount of faith and trust – school gives no guarantees of success or happiness.

So I thought I’d just put these pictures here as you may well have read about the girls when they were little in ‘A Funny Kind of Education’ and they feature in the stories in ‘A Home Education Notebook’, to reassure you and encourage you to quit worrying and just get on with the very important business of enjoying your home educating time with your littlies because there will come a time when you only see them in snatches and only rarely get a pic! And it’s so lovely when you do, so just this once I’m sharing it with you!

Happy times with the girls in Brighton recently, Chelsea left, Charley right!