Where does meat come in your children’s education!

I was already aware that eating meat is having a detrimental impact on the health of the planet.

But I was totally uneducated as to why or the scale of it until I saw this programme: ‘Meat: A Threat To Our Planet?’ on BBC1.

Read the review in inews

This amazing and disturbing programme has put me right and probably should be part of everyone’s education. Well worth a watch.

We know our eating habits have a huge impact on our individual health. But perhaps we’ve all been less aware how those habits impact on our planetary health and our CHILDREN’S FUTURE because of it.

Encouraging the youngsters to learn about and know themselves should be part of any education and understanding where their food comes from and how it affects them is part of this. This is the only way they – and you – can make informed choices about enjoying food and nutrition in ways that are SUSTAINABLE and of least threat to the planet, as all of our lifestyle habits need to be. So help them learn what this really means.

After all, it is the children who will be living on it when we are gone. So it is nothing less than our duty to establish habits and understanding as families now, that protect the planet from growing threats. There cannot surely be any part of education more important than how to sustain life; theirs, all others, and the planet on which they all depend.

We’re all making important changes, like reducing our use of plastic for example, but this is a change that receives less coverage and the programme helps us see other valuable changes we can make to help keep the planet going for our children.

11 thoughts on “Where does meat come in your children’s education!

  1. Interesting post Ross. As a family who haven’t eaten meat/fish in years, I also think that teaching our children to have compassion for all living beings is an important part of education. If they can value the life of every creature then they (I believe) will go on to show the same level of compassion to both their fellow humans, and the environment.

    • Thank you Alice, yes; that point about compassion came up in the programme. And they made the point also that if everyone had to raise and kill their own meat our meat eating habits would radically change!

  2. Thanks for your comment and sharing your story. Hopefully the programme will come up on YouTube and I think there is a Ted talk about the issue! Sounds like you do the right things with regard to meat eating and like you I detest waste. In fact it was mentioned in the programme how we should respect our food and the life that’s provided it and therefore not waste any.

  3. I have been vegetarian for over twenty years. My husband and children eat a little meat. All the meat we buy is from a farmers market direct from the farmer, we buy one chicken a month and a few packs of sausages. We have visited the farm where our chicken comes from and have seen how they are kept/looked after. I don’t have a TV or a licence so am unable to watch this programme but would be interested to do so. I have felt for years that people eat too much meat and that most of the animal is thrown away. I have never bought meat in a supermarket in my life and never would do. I would always want to know the provenance of it, buying direct from the farmer is how I will always buy meat.

    • Thanks for your comment and sharing your story. Hopefully the programme will come up on YouTube and I think there is a Ted talk about the issue! Sounds like you do the right things with regard to meat eating and like you I detest waste. In fact it was mentioned in the programme how we should respect our food and the life that’s provided it and therefore not waste any.

  4. My husband is a chef and he is a huge supporter of organic and free-range farming, seasonality, nose to tail eating, traceability, good provenance, and food waste reduction. I support him on this and I firmly believe that the supermarket giants and the food industry has a massive social responsibility in terms of the impact of battery farming and their intentional omission to educate their customers/diners about provenance. This industry is run by loads of greedy businessmen/restaurateurs who are always after a good GP / Gross Profit. But how do you get a good GP? Cheap produce – from battery farms. Cheap fish from abroad. If you know someone who is a chef, ask them about the GP and how it works. I honestly think that this is the issue that we should be talking about. We need to start supporting organic and genuine free-range farmers because their farming method is the most labour-intensive. Yet they continue to use this method because they know that this is the best for our planet. At the same time, we need to start training our children about provenance. Let us teach them to ask a waiter/chef/fishmonger/butcher, “Where did that meat/fish come from?”

    • Thank you very much for this comment and helping to inform us all – it’s a good point to ask about provenance. Very much appreciate you took the time to share those thoughts here.

  5. For a sustainable future, giving up meat is the most positive thing a person can do first, before going into all the details of this and that. It’s not a sacrifice to stop sacrificing other sentient beings to the altar of “Normal” eating habits (and habits is exactly what it is all about).

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