Diversity and how it could transform education

002I recently read Ken Robinson’s book ‘The Element’ on finding your talents and passions. I was so uplifted by it.

One of the things I found so liberating was his explanation of why talents and passions are so important to the growth and perpetuation of the human race, not something that gets acknowledged in our education system! Especially with continuing cuts to arts subjects.

Most particularly dear to my heart is his chapter on education right at the end where he says how important it is for education to develop individuals rather than clone our children as if they were on a factory line, as he describes the educational system in America – it equally applies in the UK. It is through this individualism – through children finding their talents – that we will progress, both as a people and as a planet.

You’ll have to read it to fully understand his theories. But here’s a little taster from the final chapter that identifies why so many of the approaches home educating families use work so well simply because they pay attention to that individual development and thus escape the cloning he describes:

“….education puts relentless pressure on its students to conform. Schools…were created in the image of industrialism. In many ways they reflect the factory culture they were designed to support….Schools divide the curriculum into specialist segments: some teachers install math in the students, and others install history. They arrange the day into standard units of time, marked out by the ringing of bells, much like a factory announcing the beginning of the work day and the end of breaks. Students are educated in batches, according to age, as if the most important things they have in common was their date of manufacture. They are given standardised tests at set points and compared with each other before being sent out onto the market.

The fact is that given the challenges we face, education doesn’t need to be reformed – it needs to be transformed. The key to this transformation is not to standardise education but to personalise it, to build achievement on discovering the individual talents of each child, to put students in an environment where they want to learn and where they can naturally discover their true passions…”

An insightful passage!

If only we could stop educating for standardisation and educate for diversity we would stand a chance of really transforming what goes on in schools and maybe lessen the increasing numbers of young people, parents and teachers who are completely disenchanted by what we still call education, but which amounts to little more than manufacturing.

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