Is school really educating?

When you’ve been through school yourself and it was a successful experience you’d probably never think about it?002

And some people prefer to be silently led and feel part of an institution without challenging traditions, or ‘being difficult’ as it’s sometimes labelled!

I think I must be one of the ‘difficult’ ones. Because I’ve suspected from the outset that school doesn’t really educate as we need it too. In fact it inhibits the kind of thinking required for us to develop and progress.

Thankfully I’m no longer alone in those thoughts. And it’s really wonderful to find others who think, like I and other home educating parents do, that school is beginning to look more and more like a farming process for the benefit of the institution – and politics – than it is about the education of individuals.

Ken Robinson is another of those who also challenges this cloning of our children and their diverse talents, increasingly neglected in the laboratory of controlled experiences for a narrow set of outcomes, as schooling has become. (Find him here)

He talks about schooling in his book ‘The Element How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything’ and how he feels it is outdated. He raises three key issues.

Firstly, he says that schools are preoccupied with specific academic ability rather than the broader intelligences that each human being is capable of. So school can become a narrowing experience rather than an developmental one.

Secondly, he says that the hierarchy of subjects, with maths, sciences and language skills at the top, humanities in the middle and arts at the bottom, neglects the fact that it is diverse thinking developed through creative practises which help the world progress and which are at the forefront of human progress (like the Net for example). So we desperately need the creative subjects that are becoming squeezed out along with the more physical and practical.

And thirdly, the obsession with particular types of assessment, via a narrow range of standardised tests, negates the developmental progress of an individual and essential creativity of thinking.

The result is a narrowing of intelligence, capacity and talent, rather than a broadening of it, and a complete dismissal of all the more human elements like relationships, character, emotions and expression, which are an essential part of our intelligent growth.

He goes on to explain how ‘getting back to basis’ is far from a good thing because we need new ‘basics’ for our new world.

We basically need new thinking, both educational and personal, for our new world. But schools are not supporting that need as their goals and targets become narrow and political.

It makes for fascinating reading. And I applaud his ideas; it’s so comforting to find others thinking the same.

So if you’ve never looked at schooling like this before his book will ignite some exciting thinking! Excited thinking being exactly what we need to help the world progress.

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8 thoughts on “Is school really educating?

  1. As a teacher, obviously I’m supporter of the idea of schools in general. Still, I think you raise some interesting points about the purpose of schools and what thy are becoming. I teach English and regularly find myself under pressure to skip the enjoyable bits of literature to focus on exam prep, or failing to find time for truly creative because it’s never really assessed. There is definitely scope to rethink what education is for and how it can be structured. Thanks for the reading recommendation – I’love definitely look it up!

  2. I think the problem lies in assuming an incorrect purpose for schools. They weren’t established to educate, to teach thinking skills. They were created to foster good citizenship! Education is a personal responsibility.

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