Mumhood – do you really appreciate what you do?

Untitled-12 changed I’m excited to tell you that my latest book Mumhood is now available on Kindle.

There’s been so much needed saying about becoming a mum I’ve been nearly bursting with it over the past years. So to be able now to give mums the credit and support they so deserve is like a dream come true for me; to be able to champion the life-changing, life-long transition they go through, expose the huge hidden workload and the essential role they play and give a little hand in coping with it.

But even more than that; the most important thing was to remind mums of their incomparable worth and real reason they matter so much to us all – when you become a mum it’s so easy to forget that!

The earlier chapters deal with life as you start out as a mum and the later ones grow with you and your baby. Here’s an exclusive extract from chapter 7 to sample:

…….What is it all worth? All this work you do as a mum? All the dilemma and the decision making, all the labour and the toil, the role you now play, the time you spend with your child, the hard task of sorting it all out. The mountain of unending jobs. What is it all really, really worth? What is the value of it?

In answer to that question here’s a fact that is so, so often overlooked:

PARENTS are SO IMPORTANT.                                  

Because:

The future of our world depends on the future of our children and parents are responsible for that.

The work of caring for, raising, nurturing, encouraging, primarily educating and developing those children is what parents do. Therefore it is the most worthwhile work you could ever be doing. It is one of the most valuable positions in society that you could ever have. You will be influencing the future. Everyone’s future.

How mums are worth it

Basically our children are a national treasure. Children and how they develop will govern the future; we’ll be dead and gone and they’ll be taking over and their children after that and so on….

So the people who care for them play a vital role. It’s as straightforward as that.

Basically, in the hands of the mums and dads lies the future of the human race. Simply because the future of our society, of our race, of our planet, is perpetuated by our children and how they interact with it, so therefore it is also in the hands of the parents who are responsible for those children. And since it is we mums I’m focussing on here, it is therefore true to say that a part of everyone’s future lies in our hands. It usually follows that what we do, our children will do. How we parent they will parent and so on…

Imagine for a moment who you’re raising.

Imagine how you could be holding in your hands the initial care and development of the next Einstein, or the next scientist who will perhaps solve the problem of global warming, or the next Prime Minister who might be finally able to bring about world peace, the next consultant who may be able to find a cure for cancer, or the next person who can solve the problems of drug abuse, crime, unwanted pregnancies, and other flaws in our society.

Just imagine – you never know what your children will become. What a thought!

But it is true, isn’t it? If you think about it like that – it must be – our children are the future. However big or small their contribution; in one way or another, they will be making a contribution. Our jobs as mums is to guide their contribution towards being a positive one.

For equally important are the less glamorous roles our kids might play like nurses or carers or teachers, cleaners or bin men, factory workers or farmers, creators of their own businesses. They are all an essential part of making our planet what it is. Every job our kids may do makes a contribution of some sort and it isn’t any less valuable because it may be less well glamorised.

Yet the majority of society remains so blind to that simple staggering truth. And the worth of our children, the value of the mothers who devote so much of themselves, so much of their personal time and attention to caring for them, remains so criminally, and dangerously, underestimated.

I so feel for every mum out there. I feel for every grain of self that women give to be mums. For it’s rarely appreciated how much is given. And lack of appreciation doesn’t help mums to feel happy doing that giving.

It’s important that mums have a sense of worth and happiness. It’s important for our own sake, and it’s important that our children are happy if they’re going to thrive and become the valuable members of society that they could be.

More often they are a product of a society where happiness doesn’t have its rightful and important place in our value system.

What does it matter? Why does happiness matter so much?

Why happiness matters and how society devalues mums

Happiness matters because happy people make up a society that is caring, respectful and good.

It matters because the world’s children are important and to make a good contribution they need to be happy too.

It matters because your individual child is important and the work you do as a mother to raise your child is immensely valuable. So the way you are with your child will be much better if you are happy, you will be a better parent…..

The book shows ways to do this, how to cope with becoming a mum, how to deal with the changes you go through, the workload and your new role and most importantly how to look after yourself so you get the best out of it.

You’ll find more details on recent posts ‘Hindsight for mums’ and ‘Especially for mums’ and on the ‘My Books’ page. Or you can buy the Kindle edition here.

I sincerely hope you like it and find in it the support you deserve.

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